1. Knotty by nature
UChicago physicists solve the puzzle of how to tie knots in fluids.
→ Watch the video

    Knotty by nature

    UChicago physicists solve the puzzle of how to tie knots in fluids.

    Watch the video

  2. scavjudges:

    2012 Scav Hunt Ad Campaign, courtesy The Mark RSO.

  3. Mummy figures
There are 89 mummies at the Oriental Institute: some animal, some human, some intact, some in pieces (mostly disembodied hands, feet, and heads), some on display, and many more in storage.
At the request of Chicago’s public radio station, WBEZ, Oriental Institute researchers counted up all the mummies, and from that tally, WBEZ created this graphic.
It was the first time Egyptologist Emily Teeter, PhD’90, had seen the mummy list in its entirety. “I had no idea we had a monkey paw,” she says. “That’s straight out of Edgar Allan Poe.”
→ Read the story

    Mummy figures

    There are 89 mummies at the Oriental Institute: some animal, some human, some intact, some in pieces (mostly disembodied hands, feet, and heads), some on display, and many more in storage.

    At the request of Chicago’s public radio station, WBEZ, Oriental Institute researchers counted up all the mummies, and from that tally, WBEZ created this graphic.

    It was the first time Egyptologist Emily Teeter, PhD’90, had seen the mummy list in its entirety. “I had no idea we had a monkey paw,” she says. “That’s straight out of Edgar Allan Poe.”

    Read the story

  4. View from the page
Pulitzer Prize-winning Wall Street Journal columnist Bret Stephens, AB’95, brings a UChicago intellectual spirit to the sword fight of political commentary.
"What I most want to do is get a reader to think. To react. To maybe rethink his own views. To enlarge his views. I feel like when an institution like the Wall Street Journal hands me something like a newspaper column, in effect I’m being handed a sword to do right as I see it. To call out the bad guys, to praise the good guys, to defend the weak, to attack the wicked. That’s my view of a column.”
___
→ Read the interview 
Pictured: Stephens majored in fundamentals at the College. (Photography by Jason Smith)

    View from the page

    Pulitzer Prize-winning Wall Street Journal columnist Bret Stephens, AB’95, brings a UChicago intellectual spirit to the sword fight of political commentary.

    "What I most want to do is get a reader to think. To react. To maybe rethink his own views. To enlarge his views. I feel like when an institution like the Wall Street Journal hands me something like a newspaper column, in effect I’m being handed a sword to do right as I see it. To call out the bad guys, to praise the good guys, to defend the weak, to attack the wicked. That’s my view of a column.”

    ___

    → Read the interview

    Pictured: Stephens majored in fundamentals at the College. (Photography by Jason Smith)

  5. Phoenix phashion
These flyers on the second floor of Cobb advertise a UChicago sweater “available in limited quantities.” Presumably Karl Marx and Dean Boyer got their orders in early.
Photography by Carrie Golus, AB’91, AM’93

    Phoenix phashion

    These flyers on the second floor of Cobb advertise a UChicago sweater “available in limited quantities.” Presumably Karl Marx and Dean Boyer got their orders in early.

    Photography by Carrie Golus, AB’91, AM’93

  6. One giant leap
On this day 45 years ago, Apollo 11 astronauts Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong returned to Earth after their historic walk on the moon.
Long before the space race began, renowned astrophysicist and astronomy professor Gerard Peter Kuiper (1905–1973)—who spent most of his career at the University of Chicago and Yerkes Observatory—began the work that helped make those first steps on the moon possible: publishing a photographic lunar atlas that systematically mapped the moon’s surface.
After leaving his post at Yerkes, Kuiper headed to Tuscon where he founded the University of Arizona’s Lunar and Planetary Laboratory. There he led a team that published three more lunar atlases that NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration researchers used to find the best places on the moon where the Apollo 11 astronauts could land.
Pictured: Kuiper’s personal copy of the Photographic Lunar Atlas, published by the University of Chicago Press. Each section of the moon folds out into poster-sized sheets with photographs taken at varying sun angles. The atlas came in a red box measuring 18 by 22 inches and weighed 22 pounds. Its list price was $25.
Bonus fact: During Kuiper’s last year as director of Yerkes, planetary science student Carl Sagan, AB’54, SB’55, SM’56, PhD’60, finished his UChicago graduate work.
For more about the Kuiper’s work, check out the essay “Mapping the Moon” by filmmaker and journalist Jason Davis.
Photo courtesy Jason Davis.

    One giant leap

    On this day 45 years ago, Apollo 11 astronauts Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong returned to Earth after their historic walk on the moon.

    Long before the space race began, renowned astrophysicist and astronomy professor Gerard Peter Kuiper (1905–1973)—who spent most of his career at the University of Chicago and Yerkes Observatory—began the work that helped make those first steps on the moon possible: publishing a photographic lunar atlas that systematically mapped the moon’s surface.

    After leaving his post at Yerkes, Kuiper headed to Tuscon where he founded the University of Arizona’s Lunar and Planetary Laboratory. There he led a team that published three more lunar atlases that NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration researchers used to find the best places on the moon where the Apollo 11 astronauts could land.

    Pictured: Kuiper’s personal copy of the Photographic Lunar Atlas, published by the University of Chicago Press. Each section of the moon folds out into poster-sized sheets with photographs taken at varying sun angles. The atlas came in a red box measuring 18 by 22 inches and weighed 22 pounds. Its list price was $25.

    Bonus fact: During Kuiper’s last year as director of Yerkes, planetary science student Carl Sagan, AB’54, SB’55, SM’56, PhD’60, finished his UChicago graduate work.

    For more about the Kuiper’s work, check out the essay “Mapping the Moon” by filmmaker and journalist Jason Davis.

    Photo courtesy Jason Davis.

  7. Robie House’s rockstar visitor
While Jack White was hanging out on 57th Street, we hope he stopped by the Oriental Institute, too. White performs at the Chicago Theatre tonight.
Fun fact: Did you know… the University of Chicago Magazine staff’s offices used to be in Robie House?
Photo courtesy Frank Lloyd Wright Trust, flwright.org

    Robie House’s rockstar visitor

    While Jack White was hanging out on 57th Street, we hope he stopped by the Oriental Institute, too. White performs at the Chicago Theatre tonight.

    Fun fact: Did you know… the University of Chicago Magazine staff’s offices used to be in Robie House?

    Photo courtesy Frank Lloyd Wright Trust, flwright.org

  8. What’s in store

    Bob Mariano, MBA’87, sheds light on what it’s like to be a supermarket CEO.

    "Sometimes I go through the store with a ball cap and sunglasses so nobody knows who I am. It’s not to do any sort of “gotcha”; it’s more for my own observations, to make sure we’re on the right path, we’re not missing anything."

    ___

    Read the interview

  9. italkapple:

    🌳🌿🍃 green is back!
    Cobb, Harper Quad, Burton-Judson

  10. uchicagoadmissions:

explore-blog:

Susan Sontag's [AB'51] exquisite Letter to Borges – a meditation on books, self-transcendence, and reading in the age of screens

Spoken like a true UChicago alum.

    uchicagoadmissions:

    explore-blog:

    Susan Sontag's [AB'51] exquisite Letter to Borges – a meditation on books, self-transcendence, and reading in the age of screens

    Spoken like a true UChicago alum.